Wax cylinders were the earliest commercial medium for recording sound. The University of California, Santa Barbara Library recently launched a new website that features over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings—all available to download or stream online for free. The searchable collection has everything from bizarre animal impressions to anti-Prohibition songs. Looking to do a historically minded good deed? The library still has a backlog of over 3,000 cylinders that have not yet been digitized. Adopt one for a tax-deductible $60 (the fee covers the rehousing, cataloging and digitizing of the cylinder).

Here are 5 incredible recordings that you need to put on your old-timey playlist right now:

Wax-Cylinder-Archive

via USCB Cylinder Audio Archive

1) It’s The Smart Little Feller Who Stocked Up His Cellar (That’s Getting The Beautiful Girls) 1920:

This anti-prohibition song is about “a chicken-chasing millionaire” who can’t catch a break with the ladies. Why? They’re too busy hanging out with “the smart little feller who stocked up his cellar.”

1920_SM_Its_The_Smart_Little_Feller_Who_Stocked_Up_His_Cellar_1

2) We’re all going calling on the Kaiser (1918):

This World War I propaganda song has some pretty amazing lyrics. Highlights include: “Oh, John, pack up your kit and come along with me. There’s a party ‘cross the sea, and we’re all going callin on the Kaiser!”

Calling-on-the-kaiser

3) Vintage Animal Noises (unknown):

Full disclosure: You probably don’t want this on your playlist. This terrifying home recording features an unidentified male voice and a strange selection of animal noises. We just thought you should know about it.

Vintage Easter Cards (6)

via vintage everyday

4) The Freight Wreck at Altoona (1926):

This haunting ballad is about a long forgotten train wreck. On 29 November 1925, a runaway freight train crashed within two hundred yards of the Pennsylvania passenger station. It was one of the worst disasters in the history of the Pennsylvania Railroad.

altoona_pa_train_wreck_11-29-1925

via GenDisasters.com

Feature image via Duke University Library