In early 2016, I took it upon myself to source a number of photographs that demonstrate best that time and advent, photographs that captured character and atmosphere. These photographs were captured in monochrome and would be transformed into color as accurately as possible. Maybe the purpose of this was, or still is, to re-enthuse observers and celebrate some rather incredible people and moments.

Image credit NASA

April of 1970. NASA Flight Director Eugene Kranz at his console, is leading a Mission Control team to save the crew of Apollo 13. Color time 380 minutes.

 Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past


Image credit NASA

April of 1970. Commander James A. Lovell of Apollo 13 on screen at NASA Mission Control, lead by NASA Flight Director Eugene Kranz. Color time 520 minutes. I've colorized a lot of photographs but this has to be one that I remember best working on. I can close my eyes and travel into that very room, owing to how long it took to complete. It must have been quite incredible to be there at that time, to witness that fully.

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past

In a fortunate turn of events I got word from a man that witnessed the launch of a Saturn 5 rocket. His name is Ron Christie and kindly he's allowed me to include his words below. I think they're very fitting in the way they describe that time in history

You would have to find someone a hell of a lot more eloquent than I, to do any justice to the launch of a Saturn 5. At the time it was the biggest rocket ever produced. A day before i had taken the Cape Kennedy NASA Tour and saw it on the pad. Massive! When it lit up at launch there was barely any sound until its engines emerged from below the table. There was so much white smoke i thought for a second the entire launch pad was on fire and everything was lost. Then the boom and the sound hit everyone. I saw every bird in the whole area take flight, flapping as fast as they could to get out of the area. Little kids started to cry at the noise and the spectacle of this long white thing rising out of the ground. So slow at first. Then the crackling sounds hit us as it cleared the tower. You could feel the sound in you chest as it started to speed up. I have watched every launch in front of our TV since 1961 but to see it live was ... almost every adult there had tears in their eyes as the little kids screamed with fright. The higher it got the louder it got. Until it reaches that point where it starts to become a roar again and all you see is flame hundreds of feet long. Its a stunning sight to see such a huge thing fly and to know there are men inside it. To me the most moving was the vets and American servicemen saluting as they watched the rocket fly into space. These were the days we could get into the used space capsules that had returned men from space. To be able to touch and sit inside Friendship 7 was inspiring. I will add here that I was on my way to the Cape in July of 1969 to see Apollo 11, but blew an engine west of Chicago and missed the launch. Ironic but the same &$£$ing thing kept me from Woodstock!

Ron Christie - Southern Alberta

Image credit NASA

John Young, above,  is arguably one of the most decorated individuals in NASA history. Here below is his photograph colorized; in the photograph itself he is undertaking final checks for Gemini III in 1965.

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past

Below is Charles Duke, during Apollo 11.

Image credit NASA

In April 1966, Duke was one of the 19 selected for NASA's fifth group of astronauts. In 1969, he was a member of the astronaut support crew for Apollo 10. He then served as CAPCOM for Apollo 11, the first landing on the Moon, where his distinctive Southern drawl became familiar to audiences around the world. As CAPCOM, he became the voice of a Mission Control.

Color time 200 minutes.

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past

Below is another photograph that took a long time to realize in color; it was taken in 1969.

Image credit NASA

Everybody in this photograph has their mind on their objective on the first day of Apollo 10 lunar orbit at Mission Control, Kennedy Space Center.

Color time 240 minutes

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past

There are probably thousands of individuals that associate heavily with the space programs of the time, some in particular stood out, obviously Eugene Kranz is a household name but Frances Northcutt also stands out.

Image credit NASA

At the age of 25 she would help design the return-to-Earth trajectory that the Apollo 8 crew took from the moon; she also helped design and build the descent engine for the Apollo lunar landing.

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past

So, take a look at a complete 16x speed colorization of a man that made history time and time again, John Young. It is set to the radio comm's of the Gemini III mission.

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past

The idea here was to celebrate the past in two ways, by leaving it alone and encouraging it equally. John W. Aaron is a former NASA engineer and was a flight controller during the Apollo program. He is widely credited with saving the Apollo 12 mission when it was struck by lightning soon after launch, and he played an important role during the Apollo 13 crisis. He remains locked in the monochrome of the time while the instruments and console are realized.

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past

This brief journey completes with the above photographs set to radio comms during the Apollo 13.

Image credit NASA colorized by My Colorful Past